Safari Doctors in Bringing Medical Aid to Rural Kenya

Safari Doctors in Bringing Medical Aid to Rural Kenya

The UNICEF has hailed Kenya as a “success” for their steady progress in battling poverty and working towards a superior economic condition. In any case, while they have prevailed in this circle, they have failed elsewhere.

For all the advances made over a number of sectors of the Kenyan economy, the health sector still remains appallingly understaffed with just 1 specialist and 12 medical attendants accessible to every 10,000 individuals in the country today.

This circumstance has been compounded by the activities of the Islamic-terror group al-Shabaab, which has been focusing on the eastern shoreline of the nation. Al-Shabaab has caused many medical aids to flee their posts in dread of their own wellbeing.

Just 4.5 percent of Kenya’s GDP has been put to the use of medicinal facilities and medical services. Also, wherever, medical services have been made accessible, its quality has been significantly lacking.

This is what has incited Umra Omar, a local of Lamu Archipelago on Kenya’s eastern drift to come up with ‘Safari Doctors’. Omar is a former student of a reputed college in the USA and chose to make a return to her native country to help those in need.

‘Safari Doctors’ is Omar’s manner of “giving back” to the country of her birth. Safari Doctors utilize boats to go to zones that are far from the mainland and have no access to medical services. It gives free essential restorative help to those in Lamu and its encompassing ranges. The services that Safari Doctors renders include vaccinations, maternity services and treatment for intestinal sickness and other common illnesses. Omar and her establishment service upwards of 1000 individuals on a yearly basis and each excursion are carried out in accordance with the funds available at the time.

Omar stated, “It was a kind of sense of responsibility to come back to where I was born.” With approximately six villages in Lamu with zero access to healthcare, residents are alienated as a boat trip from Lamu to one of its surrounding islands can cost as much as $300 or a week of salary.”

Omar makes bi-month to month excursions to these areas and each outing takes up to four days to finish.

Omar remains an example of how one individual can make a major change even in overwhelming conditions like that of war and destitution. Her remarkable endeavors have earned her the esteemed CNN Hero of 2016 honor.

Posted in news.